Athenian democracy trumbach

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Athenian democracy trumbach

Palwasha Suri Professor Trumbach 9/26/17 HIS Paper #1 - Solon TO B.C was the time of Ancient Athens. In “ The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives” by Plutarch, discusses one of Athens lawmaker, statesman and poet after B.C., Solon. page 5 of 10 · Athenian Democracy: the Assembly ·. The Assembly (Ekklesia, ἐκκλησία) was the regular gathering of male Athenian citizens (women also enjoyed a certain citizen status, but without political rights) to listen to, discuss, and vote on decrees that affected every aspect of Athenian life, both public and private, from financial matters to religious ones, from public. Aristotle’s Constitu-tion of Athens, The Constitution of the Athenians, and the books History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides and The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives by Plutarch will be used along with Professor Trumbach’s lecture as primary sources of evidence for this essay.

Visit Website Ostracism, in which a citizen could be expelled from Athens for 10 years, was among the powers of the ekklesia. The Ekklesia Athenian democracy was made up of three important institutions.

The first was the ekklesia, or Assembly, the sovereign governing body of Athens. Any member of the demos--any one of those 40, adult male citizens--was welcome to attend the meetings of the ekklesia, which were held 40 times per year in a hillside auditorium west of the Acropolis called the Pnyx.

Athenian democracy trumbach about 5, men attended each session of the Assembly; the rest were serving in the army or navy or working to support their families.

At the meetings, the ekklesia made decisions about war and foreign policy, wrote and revised laws and approved or condemned the conduct of public officials.

Ostracism, in which a citizen could be expelled from the Athenian city-state for 10 years, was among the powers of the ekklesia.

Ancient Greek Democracy - HISTORY

The group made decisions by simple majority vote. The boule was a group of men, 50 from each of ten Athenian tribes, who served on the Council for one year. Unlike the ekklesia, the boule met every day and did most of the hands-on work of governance. It supervised government workers and was in charge of things like navy ships triremes and army horses.

It dealt with ambassadors and representatives from other city-states. Its main function was to decide what matters would come before the ekklesia. In this way, the members of the boule dictated how the entire democracy would work.

Positions on the boule were chosen by lot and not by election. This was because, in theory, a random lottery was more democratic than an election: The lottery system also prevented the establishment of a permanent class of civil servants who might be tempted to use the government to advance or enrich themselves.

However, historians argue that selection to the boule was not always just a matter of chance. They note that wealthy and influential people--and their relatives--served on the Council much more frequently than would be likely in a truly random lottery.

The Dikasteria The third important institution was the popular courts, or dikasteria. Every day, more than jurors were chosen by lot from a pool of male citizens older than There were no police in Athens, so it was the demos themselves who brought court cases, argued for the prosecution and the defense, and delivered verdicts and sentences by majority rule.

Athenian democracy trumbach

There were also no rules about what kinds of cases could be prosecuted or what could and could not be said at trial, and so Athenian citizens frequently used the dikasteria to punish or embarrass their enemies.

Jurors were paid a wage for their work, so that the job could be accessible to everyone and not just the wealthy but, since the wage was less than what the average worker earned in a day, the typical juror was an elderly retiree.

Since Athenians did not pay taxes, the money for these payments came from customs duties, contributions from allies and taxes levied on the metoikoi.Aug 23,  · Watch video · Athenian democracy was made up of three important institutions.

Athenian democracy trumbach

The first was the ekklesia, or Assembly, the sovereign governing body of Athens. Any member of the demos--any one of those 40, Athenian democracy developed around the fifth century BC in the Greek city-state (known as a polis) of Athens, comprising the city of Athens and the surrounding territory of Attica, and is often described as the first known democracy in the world.

Other Greek cities set up democracies, most following the Athenian model, but none are as well.

Solon and Aristocracy - Words | Cram

Betty Huang Professor R. Trumbach HIS Outline: The Athenian Constitution I. Before Solon A. Loans were made on the security of the person and failure to repay by the due date would result in the borrowers and their family to be liable for seizure.

Since Athenian law is the subject of this discussion series, the present introduction to Athenian democracy will not describe the lawcourts in as much detail as it has given to the Assembly and Council. Democracy first appeared in Athens towards the beginning of the fifth century B.C.

The biggest difference between Athenian democracy and almost all other democracies is that the Athenian version was a direct democracy rather than being representative.

The sources used in this paper are The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives by Plutarch, History of Peloponnesian War by Thucydides, and The Last days of Socrates by Plato.

Notes from the lectures given by Professor Trumbach will also be mentioned%(10).

Fall of Athens - Research Paper by Ryanscanman